Land & Mineral Owner Partnerships


ECA is committed to being a very good corporate neighbor. By partnering with us, landowners can be confident that ECA is the best at exploring and producing natural gas and oil. We are experts – we do it very well, and we do it safely and cleanly.

We are also unique in the industry. As a mid-size energy company, we are large enough to employ the latest technologies and highest safety and environmental standards in our operations, but we are also small enough to work directly with you throughout the drilling process.

We strive to maintain strong, mutually-beneficial relationships with our landowners. That is why we have dedicated this section of our website to landowners and populated it with resources designed especially for you.

Landowner Frequently Asked Questions


When approached about a potential lease, landowners typically have a number of questions ranging from how a well is drilled to when payments will begin to arrive. We have identified 10 of the most common questions we hear and provide their answers below.

What is the Marcellus Shale?

The Marcellus Shale is a sedimentary rock formation that was deposited more than 350 million years ago and underlies parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. While we have known for decades that the Marcellus Shale contains significant reserves of natural gas, the combination of two, time-tested technologies (horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing) now enable drillers to extract that gas, which was previously thought to be inaccessible.

How long does it take to drill a well?

For a single well, the process typically takes between four and six months from start to finish. This includes site and well pad preparation, drilling, fracturing, and well completion. At times, multiple wells may be located on a single pad, which can extend this timeline.

What is hydraulic fracturing?

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracing or fracking, is “a well stimulation process used to maximize the extraction of underground resources; including oil, natural gas, geothermal energy, and even water. The oil and gas industry uses hydraulic fracturing to enhance subsurface fracture systems to allow oil or natural gas to move more freely from the rock pores to production wells that bring the oil or gas to the surface.” For more information about the hydraulic fracturing process, visit About Hydraulic Fracturing.

If I sign a lease, does that mean I will have drilling on my property?

Not necessarily. Signing a lease will allow ECA to explore for gas and/or oil on your property and, if it is determined that your property is appropriate for production, ECA may exercise the option to drill there as well.

How does pooling work? How much royalty will I get from a well unit?

Pooling, sometimes called unitization, allows ECA to assemble an area of land from parcels owned by multiple individuals. This creates an area large enough for drilling. In pooling situations, individual landowners receive a pro-rated share of the royalty based on the percent of acreage they own in the unit.

Will I still be able to farm and hunt on my land if I sign a lease?

Absolutely. While for safety reasons it would be important for you to avoid areas where we have personnel and equipment on site, our potential operations should in no way impact your access to, or use of, the remainder of your property.

How can I tell if I own the oil and gas under my property?

This information should be on record with the county where the property is located.

Who regulates oil and gas drilling?

Because the geology of natural gas formations varies greatly throughout different areas of the country, individual states are the most adept and prepared to provide day-to-day oversight of oil and natural gas development. Each of the following agencies has specific regulations in place designed to protect the air, land, and water within their jurisdictions.

Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission
Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet – Division of Oil and Gas
Montana Board of Oil and Gas
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection – Office of Oil and Gas Management
Railroad Commission of Texas – Oil and Gas Division
West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection – Office of Oil and Gas
Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission

What do I need to know if I have an ECA pipeline on my property?
I have questions that are not addressed here. Who do I contact?

If you have already been in contact with a member of ECA’s Land department concerning a potential lease, feel free to reach out to your contact with your questions directly. If you do not have a direct contact, email us at info@eca.com and we will provide you with an appropriate contact.

Hydraulic Fracturing Frequently Asked Questions


Landowners sometimes ask questions about hydraulic fracturing, so ECA has compiled a list of reliable resources designed to help you better understand the hydraulic fracturing process  ̶  how it works, what chemicals it involves, and where you can turn for more information.

What is hydraulic fracturing?

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracing or fracking, is “a well stimulation process used to maximize the extraction of underground resources; including oil, natural gas, geothermal energy, and even water. The oil and gas industry uses hydraulic fracturing to enhance subsurface fracture systems to allow oil or natural gas to move more freely from the rock pores to production wells that bring the oil or gas to the surface.”

How does hydraulic fracturing work?

Industry organizations have produced a variety of informative resources designed to help individuals and landowners better understand hydraulic fracturing. The following are links to credible videos, fact sheets, and frequently asked questions about this important process.

What makes up hydraulic fracturing fluid?

Typical hydraulic fracturing fluids are a solution containing 99.5 percent water and sand and 0.5 percent additives. These additives consist of household chemicals found in laundry detergent, table salt, and even ice cream.

As a participant in FracFocus, the national hydraulic fracturing chemical registry, the specific contents of fluids utilized in ECA’s hydraulic fracturing processes are open to the public and this database is updated frequently. Simply visit FracFocus.org and complete the search criteria to locate the information you seek.

How is my water protected during drilling and hydraulic fracturing?

For most Marcellus formation wells, hydraulic fracturing occurs about one mile below the surface, which is thousands of feet below the water table, typically located around 400 feet. So, there are thousands of feet of impermeable rock between the shale and groundwater. In addition, ECA installs many layers of steel casing and cement, which isolate fluids or other materials in the wellbore from entering the surrounding rock formations. For additional details about water protection, see this FAQ by Energy Speaks.

I still have questions; where can I find more information?